All the space in between

Collage image

POSTPONED

The School of Art & Art History at the University of Illinois at Chicago is excited to announce our 2020 MFA Thesis Exhibitions.

Featuring artists:

Maggie Hubbard

Larsen Husby

Eileen Mueller

Paige Taul


Curator:

Onyx Montes

All exhibitions to take place in Gallery 400, an integral part of both the University of Illinois at Chicago’s and the city of Chicago’s vibrant contemporary arts scene.

Maggie Hubbard

Black and white photograph of a young woman with short brown hair and glasses.

Bio:

Maggie Hubbard (b. 1991, Northwest Suburbs of Chicago, IL) utilizes painting as a way of questioning and knowing. Starting from a point of personal narrative, Hubbard then depicts people, objects and spaces that are charged with political and social connections. These illustrative renderings aim to capture the psychological residue of whiteness in middle-class America.

 

Non-negotiable truth: Grief is a driving force for me; it’s an acknowledgment and a practice of being present to reality. It’s the thing I keep coming back to.

 

 

Playlist:

The Forest – José González

Down The Dirt Road Blues – Charley Patton

Something Came to Me – Donnie Trumpet & The Social Experiment

Georgia – Brittany Howard

 

Larsen Husby

Black and white photograph of a young man.

Bio:

Larsen Husby is an interdisciplinary artist working in drawing, sculpture, installation, performance, and the written word. His practice is deeply rooted in the theme of place: how it is represented, interpreted, and experienced. He has also worked in public practice: in 2013, he co-founded the Minneapolis Art Lending Library, a non-profit organization which lends out original works of art to Twin Cities residents free of charge. He received a BA from Macalester College in 2012, and is currently enrolled in the MFA program at the University of Illinois at Chicago.

 

Artist Statement:

Larsen Husby (b. 1990, Boston) is an interdisciplinary artist working in drawing, sculpture, installation, and performance. His practice is deeply rooted in the theme of place: how it is represented, interpreted, and experienced.

 

Non-negotiable truth:

It came to me recently that my art practice has consisted of a single question, asked over and over: Where am I? This is both an existential and literal question, and every time I ask it, I come to new answers and ever more questions. Sometimes this is frustrating, but it is also invigorating. “Where am I?” keeps me moving. It is an endless road, and I intend to keep walking down it as long as I can.

 

Playlist

Ethio invention No. 1 – Andrew Bird

SPACE – Amber Mark

California – Angel Olsen

Seventeen – Sharon Van Etten

Francis Forever – Mitski

 

Eileen Mueller

Black and white photograph of a young woman with short brown hair.

Bio:

Eileen Mueller (b. 1985, Milwaukee, WI) received her BFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. Her work has shown at IM ERSTEN in Vienna, Austria; Higher Pictures in New York, NY; the Museum of Contemporary Photography, Elmhurst Art Museum, Andrew Rafacz Gallery, Iceberg Projects, Roots and Culture, and Johalla Projects in Chicago, IL. Her work is published in Phantoms In the Dirt, The Great Refusal: Taking on New Queer Aesthetics, and MAKE #16. Eileen is one half of GURL DON’T BE DUMB which has curated shows and performances across the country.

Artist statement:

Conjuring the mercurial nature of becoming I seek to both fiction and believe in a Dyke Mysticism. This work looks to an era when separatist dyke communities formed at the frayed edges of a male-dominated, heterocentric society. To separate dykes had to learn and share self-sufficient practices so that they could grow their own food and build their own houses on their own land. The DIY practices of this back to the land movement extended beyond sustainable living. Independent cultural production played a key role in forming this movement. Dykes around the country and the world served as both author and reader as they formed their own presses, video production teams, screening venues, and more. As a result a rich trove of texts exists that document this history. As my dyke predecessors did before me I have turned my camera towards the community of queer women that fill my life. Following their lead I process my own footage, forming the image by hand. I film unseen forces and unnameable traits. With a newly articulated queer gaze I look for the moments when material and practice merge with dyke iconography. How can a projected image transmute an object? Does a secret history evade observation? Is there a key to unlock this mythology? Is our ancestry real or imagined?

 

Paige Taul

Black and white photograph of a young black woman with short curly hair and glasses holding a camera.

Bio:

Paige Taul is an Oakland, CA native who received her B.A. in Studio Art with a concentration in cinematography from the University of Virginia. She currently attends the University of Illinois at Chicago for her M.F.A in Moving Image. Her work focuses on themes of blackness in relation to self and family.

 

Artist Statement:

Her work engages with and challenges assumptions of black cultural expression and notions of belonging through experimental cinematography. As a part of her filmmaking practice she test the boundaries of identity and self-identification through autoethnography to approach notions of racial authenticity. My interests lie in observing environmental and familial connections to concepts tied to racebased expectations and to expose those boundaries of identity in veins such as religion, language, and other black community based experiences.

 

Non-negotiable truth:

There are so many variables that add up to the subject matter I’m interested in, being black as well as the materials I use. Film itself isn’t the most flexible medium but filmmaking is. As I continue my career in whatever form it takes, I would love to use 16mm forever but if that proves impossible for whatever reason then I would like to think I am an adaptable enough filmmaker to change. As far as identity politics are concerned, there would be no point in claiming blackness wholly since that itself is slippery. Identity evolves as our vocabulary changes and is alive in that way. Everything is negotiable.

 

Curator: Onyx Montes

Black and white photograph of a young woman with dark and long curly hair; half of her head is in a buzzcut.

Bio:

Onyx was raised in Mexico and lived in Amsterdam and Seattle before moving to Chicago in 2015. She studied art history and women, gender & sexuality studies at the University of Washington in Seattle. She is currently pursuing her MA in Museum and Exhibition Studies at UIC and is part of the inaugural Arts & Culture Leaders of Color Fellowship by Americans for the Arts. Onyx is involved as an educator at the Art Institute and the Museum of Contemporary Art of Chicago and works as the social media manager for Hyde Park Art Center. A recent project she is proud of is the collage and art history workshop she developed and taught for incarcerated women in Mexico. She is an avid reader and well traveled with 19 countries and counting. Her interests include museum education, swimming, grunge music, eating tacos and thrift shopping.

 

Playlist:

Kendrick Lamar – XXX.FEAT.U2

Plush – Stone Temple Pilots

3 Strange Days – School of Fish